Game duck videos

The regulations governing hunting may vary from state to state so you should know the laws of the state or territory in which you are hunting and ensure that you take only those ducks which are legal game.

In normal years, eight species of native duck may be hunted in Victoria. If a duck season is modified, some game species may not be permitted for hunting. Check the current seasonal arrangements for full details.

These species are:

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Distribution and habitat

Map showing the Australian distribution of the black duck.

The Black Duck is a major game species which is common and widely distributed throughout Australia. The Black Duck occurs across a wide range of habitats from deep, permanent, reed-dominated freshwater wetlands to rivers, creeks and brackish or saline wetlands.

Status

The Black Duck is available for recreational hunting in Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania, Queensland and the Northern Territory.

Description

The Black Duck is a dark-brown bird with a pale face and throat. It has a distinctive black eye-stripe that stretches from the top of the bill through the eye. The male and female have a similar appearance.

In flight, the Black Duck is a dark bird with swift wing beats and a slender neck. The upperwing has no white but does have a green glossy colour patch on it. The underwing is white.

On the water, the Black Duck is a medium-sized duck with a slender head and neck which is carried erect.

Voice

The female makes a loud raucous quack repeated four to six times.

Images

Here are some images of the Black Duck.

Diagrams of black duck in profile.Close up of Black duck wings and head showing markings.

Video footage

Video footage of the Black Duck can be found here: Pacific Black Duck (Game Duck Species)

Map showing the Australian distribution of the Blue-winged shoveler.

*Important note; the Blue-winged Shoveler can not be hunted this duck season*

The Blue-winged Shoveler prefers permanent, well-vegetated wetlands with areas of open water. Habitat may be freshwater or saline. Usually an uncommon duck, the Blue-winged Shoveler is distributed throughout south-eastern and south-western Australia, preferring inland cumbungi swamps and coastal tea-tree swamps.

Status

The Blue-winged Shoveler is a game species and is available for recreational hunting in Victoria. Note, however, that the Blue-winged Shoveler can not be hunted this duck season. Please read Fact Sheet for more details.

Description

The Blue-winged Shoveler is a distinctive species with a slender build and a broad, blue-grey bill. The male is more colourful than the female and has a blue-grey head and neck, white face crescent, black back, a white patch on the rump and a deep chestnut-coloured belly. The colouring of the male fades when not in breeding condition. The male has bright yellow to orange legs and feet and is the only native duck to do so. The female is predominantly brown with a light chestnut-coloured belly.

In flight, the Blue-winged Shoveler has very quick wing beats with a distinctive whirr, white underwings, large pale patches on upperwing and the male has bright orange legs. In flight, the Blue-winged Shoveler appears much darker than other waterfowl and the wedge-shaped head is obvious.

On the water, the Blue-winged Shoveler is a medium-sized duck which floats low, has a distinctive wedge-shaped head and the male has a white patch on its rump

Voice

Blue-winged Shovelers are seldom heard but do have a soft chatter when flying.

Images

Here are some images of the Blue-winged Shoveler.

Close up of Blue-winged shoveler wings and head showing markings for male and female.Diagrams of Blue-winged Shoveler in profile male and female.

Video footage

Video footage of the Blue-winged Shoveler can be found here: Blue-winged Shoveler (Australasian Shoveler)

Distribution and habitat

Map showing the Australian distribution of the Chestnut teal.

Most common in brackish coastal lagoons, saltwater estuaries and the lower reaches of creeks around the coast, the Chestnut Teal is distributed in south-eastern and south-western Australia. Vagrants may occur elsewhere. Tasmania and southern Victoria are the species' stronghold.

Status

The Chestnut Teal is available for recreational hunting in Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania.

Description

The Chestnut Teal is darker and a slightly bigger bird than the Grey Teal. In flight, the wedge-shaped white patch on both the upperwing and underwing is obvious. The male Chestnut Teal has a white patch on the flank which can also be seen in flight. The male is a dark bird with a very dark head.

On the water, the Chestnut Teal is a small, dark duck which floats high. The male has a glossy green head and a white flank patch. The female and juvenile male are similar to Grey Teal, but are darker and lack the white throat.

Voice

The female Chestnut Teal has a loud penetrating "laughing" quack repeated rapidly nine times or more.

Images

Here are some images of the Chestnut Teal.

Close up of Chestnut Teal wings and head showing markings.Chestnut teal in profile.

Video footage

Video footage of the Chestnut Teal can be found here: Chestnut Teal

Distribution and habitat

Map showing the Australian distribution of the Grey Teal.

A major game species, the Grey Teal is common and widely distributed throughout Australia. Grey Teal can be found across a range of habitat types, from mangrove estuaries of the coast to deep cold lakes of the highlands. It is found in its greatest numbers in the tree-lined billabongs, lagoons and floodwaters of the Murray-Darling River system. The species is highly nomadic and will move in response to local conditions.

Status

The Grey Teal is available for recreational hunting in Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania, Queensland and the Northern Territory.

Description

The Grey Teal is a mottled brown bird which frequently mixes with other species. The Grey Teal is lighter in colour than the Chestnut Teal, particularly around the head and neck. The male and female have a similar appearance.

In flight, the Grey Teal has a wedge-shaped white patch on both the upperwing and underwing. It has a shorter and thicker neck than the Black Duck.

On the water, the Grey Teal is a small duck which floats high. Its general colour above is a dark grey-brown with a large, pale almost white face and throat. The Grey Teal has no eye stripe.

Voice

The female has a loud penetrating "laughing" quack repeated rapidly fifteen or more times.

Images

Here are some images of the Grey Teal.

Grey Teal close up drawing of wings and head.Diagrams of Grey Teal in profile.

Video footage

Video footage of the Grey Teal can be seen here: Grey Teal

Distribution and habitat

Map showing the Australian distribution of the Hardhead.

The Hardhead is widely distributed throughout Australia, however, the stronghold of the species is in the deeper, permanent freshwater swamps and lagoons of the Murray-Darling Basin and south-east South Australia. They are also common in south-west Western Australia.

Status

The Hardhead is available for recreational hunting in Victoria, South Australia, Queensland and the Northern Territory.

Description

A medium-sized, dark-brown bird with white feathers under the tail. The male has a white eye.

In flight, the Hardhead has a large white band across the belly, the underwing is translucent white and the upperwing has a white strip on the trailing edge. The Hardhead is very swift in flight with rapid, short wing beats. The wings are narrow and pointed and set well back on the body.

On the water, the Hardhead is a dark coloured duck, floating very low and sometimes the white undertail is visible.

Voice

Normally silent, but the male has a soft, wheezy whistle and the female a soft, harsh croak.

Images

Here are some images of the Hardhead.

Close up of Hardhead wings and head showing markings for male and female ducks.Drawings showing the profiles for male and female Hardhead ducks.

Video footage

Video footage of the Hardhead can be seen here: Hardhead

Distribution and habitat

Map showing the Australian distribution of the Mountain duck.

Mountain Duck are distributed throughout south-eastern and south-western Australia and inhabit lowland wetlands, both freshwater and saline, which are near pastures or arable land. Being grazers, they feed in pastures, cultivated crops and shallow water.

Status

The Mountain Duck is available for recreational hunting in Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia.

Description

The Mountain Duck is the largest Australian duck. Its dark body contrasts with brilliant white wing patches.

In flight, the Mountain Duck has large, prominent white wing patches on the shoulders of the wing, a dark bodywhite underwingschestnut-coloured breast and a white neck ring.

On the water or land, a large duck with a dark headwhite neck ringyellow-brown or chestnut-coloured breast.

The female and young birds have a white ring around the eye and a white face patch.

Voice

The Mountain Duck is a very vocal bird, especially in flight. The male has a low-pitched honk and the female has a high-pitched honk.

Images

Here are some images of the Mountain Duck.

Close up of Mountain duck wings and head showing markings male and female.Diagrams of Mountain duck in profile male and female.

Video footage

Video footage of the Mountain Duck can be found here: Mountain Duck (Australian Shelduck)

Distribution and habitat

Map showing the Australian distribution of the Pink-eared duck.

The Pink-eared Duck is widely distributed throughout inland south-eastern Australia and south-western Australia, however, vagrants occur elsewhere. The Pink-eared Duck prefers shallow, temporary waters, however, extensive open wetlands support large flocks at times.

Status

The Pink-eared Duck is available for recreational hunting in Victoria, South Australia and the Northern Territory.

Description

In flight, the head is held high with the heavy bill angled downward. The species has a light underbody, white trailing edges on upperwing and tail and a white crescent on the rump. The wings are rounded.

On the water, a small, light-coloured duck floating high with zebra stripes on body, a large bill and distinctive forehead.

The male and female have a similar appearance.

Voice

Chirrup uttered in flight.

Images

Here are some images of the Pink-eared Duck.

Close up of Pink-eared duck wings and head showing markings.Diagrams of Pink-eared duck in profile.

Video footage

Video footage of the Pink-eared Duck can be found here: Pink-eared Duck

Distribution and habitat

Map showing the Australian distribution of the wood duck.

The Wood Duck is widely distributed and is common throughout Australia. However, it is rare and considered to be a vagrant in tropical Australia. The Wood Duck prefers lightly timbered country near water, be it swamps, dams, rivers or other waterways, where there is short grass or herbage beneath the trees. It is seldom found in dense or extensive swamps and avoids brackish or saline water.

Status

The Wood Duck is available for recreational hunting in Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and the Northern Territory.

Description

The Wood Duck is a medium-sized goose-like duck with long legs, extended neck, short head and is related to the pygmy-geese of tropical Australia.

In flight, the Wood Duck has slow wing beats, large white patches on the rear of the upperwing near the body and a white triangle on the upperwing near the body. The male has a black undertail and belly while the female has a white belly and eyestripes.

On the water or on land, the Wood Duck is a medium-sized, light-coloured duck with a dark head, a characteristic high-tailed posture on water and erect posture on land.

Voice

Drawn-out nasal mew. Shorter and higher pitched in the male than the female.

Images

Here are some images of the Wood Duck.

Close up of Wood duck wings and head showing markings male and female.Diagrams of wood duck in profile male and female.

Video footage

Video footage of the Wood Duck can be found here: Wood Duck (Maned Duck)

Page last updated: 10 Dec 2019